Emerald Ash Borer Alert

Protect Your Ash Trees from this Pest Prior to Infestation.

All ash trees in NJ should be considered at high risk for EAB.

 

PHOTO COURTESY/ MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

 

THE INSECT

The adult EAB is approximately 1/2” long and 1/8” wide, metallic green in color, with a metallic copper red abdomen. The larvae are white or cream colored, measure approximately 1 to 1 ¼” long and have 10 abdominal segments that are bell shaped. The EAB has a 1-year lifecycle.

EAB adults emerge in May or early June creating D-shaped exit holes, 3-4 mm in size on the branches and trunks of infested trees. The female adult EAB feeds on the margins of the ash leaf. After feeding, the female EAB deposits eggs in bark crevices or under bark flaps on the trunk or bark. The adult beetle stays active until August. After the egg matures, larvae burrow under the bark and feed on the cambium - the water and nutrient transporting layer of the tree. The larvae become adult beetles in April or May.

SYMPTOMS

EAB first infest the top of the tree’s crown, which makes spotting adult beetles or exit holes nearly impossible from the ground. Woodpecker activity and damage on live trees is often an initial symptom of an EAB infestation. As EAB populations increase, crown dieback, epicormic branching, bark splits, and exit holes lower on the bole become more prevalent. Trees will only live an average of 3-4 years after infestation and 99% of ash trees will die.

Video Provided by U.S. Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

 

 

 

 

The tree-killing emerald ash borer (EAB) has been detected in New Jersey. Please visit www.emeraldashborer.nj.gov

 

 

 



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